Definitions

Four Ball

A  four-ball golf  match, used in match play competitions, consists of two teams of two golfers competing directly against each other. Each golfer plays his or her own ball throughout the round, such that four balls are in play. A team’s number of strokes for a given hole is that of the lower scoring team member. It is also known as best ball or more properly better ball.

In Stroke play, the scores are added normally, and the team with the lower score at the end of the match wins.

In match play, each hole is won by the team whose member has the lowest score on that hole, and that team is awarded a point for the hole. If the teams tie for a hole, the point for the hole is divided between the teams. At the end of the match, the team with the most points wins.

Gap  

 The difference between how far you hit specific clubs.  If you hit your 7 iron 145 yards and your 8 iron 135 yards you have a 10 yard gap.  Ideally you want to have similar gaps between all irons in your set to ensure you have a club for specific distances.

Scramble

A golf scramble is a format for a golf tournament. Two or more players form a team, with the rules emphasizing fun without the pressure of players keeping individual scores. Each player hits a tee shot on each hole, but everyone plays from the spot of the best shot, subject to certain criteria. Rules for playing in a scramble are informal, with tournament organizers modifying basic rules as they wish. For example, organizers may require a group to select each player’s tee shot at least twice. The scramble format is not covered under the official Rules of Golf.

Stableford Scoring System

Rather than counting the total number of strokes taken, as in stroke play, it involves scoring points based on the number of strokes taken at each hole. Unlike traditional scoring methods, where the aim is to have the lowest score, under Stableford rules, the objective is to have the highest score.

The Stableford system was developed by Dr. Frank Barney Gorton Stableford (1870–1959), to deter golfers from giving up on their round after just one or two bad holes. It was first used informally at the Glamorganshire Golf Club, Penarth, Wales, in 1898.

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